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A man from Fort Smith, Arkansas, says his Canadian wife is baffled by his pronouncing the word cement as CEE-ment. Stressing the first syllable of such words as police, insurance, umbrella, and vehicle is an occasional feature of Southerners’ speech. http://waywordradio.org via Pocket http://ift.tt/2APXHao
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A Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, woman says her family has long used the term nun puckeroo to designate a kind of vague, non-serious malaise. via Pocket http://ift.tt/2iYiMaI

There are three words in the English language that sound like “too.” So how do you indicate in writing how word should be pronounced? IPA (International Phonetic Alphabet) to the rescue! http://waywordradio.org via Pocket http://ift.tt/2zE58E3

A flea market is a type of bazaar, usually outdoors, where vendors of second-hand and discount goods sell their wares. via Pocket http://ift.tt/2A1UaZh

A woman in Council Bluffs, Iowa, says that when her mother was indicating that two things were roughly equal, she’s say they were six and one half dozen of the other. The more common version is six of one and half a dozen of the other or six of one, half a dozen of the other. via Pocket http://ift.tt/2zZJr1y

Go to grass is In the 1600s, go to grass meant to be knocked down. In the 1800s, the phrase was the equivalent of telling someone to die and go to hell. Go to grass has also been used to refer to a racehorse or working horse that’s been retired from service. A variant is go to grass and eat hay. via Pocket http://ift.tt/2zFoybt

A woman in Suffolk, Virginia, is curious about the origin of the word onus, as in responsibility. The word onus is borrowed directly from Latin where it means burden. via Pocket http://ift.tt/2zE533d

A researcher in Port Jefferson, New York, wonders if there’s a single word that means the opposite of prejudice. Unhate? He suggests the word allophilia, a combination of Greek words that mean love or like of the other. http://waywordradio.org via Pocket http://ift.tt/2A0j7EG

A San Antonio, Texas, woman wonders about a tradition she grew up with. Before drinking an alcoholic beverage, you hand the drink to someone else to have a sip in order to take the devil out of it. http://waywordradio.org via Pocket http://ift.tt/2zFyodr

A saying attributed to the 13th-century poet Rumi goes Raise your words, not voice. It is rain that grows flowers, not thunder. http://waywordradio.org via Pocket http://ift.tt/2zFynpT
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